Life Drawing

I’ll never forget how awkward I felt when I was 18 and suddenly there was a person without any clothes on right in front of me and I had to pretend it felt normal and remind myself not to giggle as I settled in for three hours of drawing.¬†After the first half hour and a little growing up, the giggles subsided and I was hooked on life drawing classes. (I hope that made you laugh, because it makes me shake my head to think about, haha.) You really had to learn to roll with the punches – sometimes you’d be so committed to something but the models would only be instructed to hold the pose for 5 or 10 minutes and you’d have to accept what you had. Other times you’d spend an hour on something and feel like you over did it. It was all so temporary.

I’ve been working on updating the portfolio¬†part of this site and had some real nostalgia rush through me as I looked through old photos. Every piece has its purpose, but it also has a memory attached to it. The image below is one of my most favourite drawings I’ve done to date. While I was in England, our life drawing class was a bit different than the ones I was used to. Our model was always the same, and the poses were much longer. He was much more social and would often walk around and see what we were doing in the middle of his pose. I asked him how he got into being an art model, and he said he did it because he wanted to be immortalized. That always stuck with me.

Your Mundane Life is Killing Me (headless man and skeleton) 23.4%22X33%22 acrylic paint, paper, collage, charcoal, wallpaper paste and graphite on paper
Your Mundane Life is Killing Me – Charcoal, paint and newsprint on paper

I was on Main St. recently and saw there are daily life drawing sessions at Basic Inquiry Gallery. So, you’ll find me there soon. If you know of any other life drawing sessions in Vancouver please let me know!